Forthcoming Visits & Lectures – 2017

Join our organised church visits in the summer and lectures in the winter – please see below.

We visit two or three neighbouring churches on summer afternoons. We arrange local speakers to give us the history of each church and to point out interesting features, and we end with tea organised by the last parish. We meet at the first church listed and members provide their own transport. Please ask if you haven’t got transport; we may be able to help.

Tickets can be booked for all Friends of Kent Churches 2017 events – Church Visits on  6 September and a tour of Rochester Cathedral on 26 September – using the  FoKC 2017 Events booking form    Also available in the Annual Report on 2016. Alternatively, EMail Jill Rutland at jill.rutland@hotmail.co.uk with your selection and pay by bank transfer.

To save postage members can chose to have their booking confirmed by email or by telephone, just fill in the appropriate part of the form.

Paying for FoKC visits by bank transfer?   Please pay to Friends of Kent Churches a/c 00025607 at Nat West Bank, 3 High St, Maidstone ME14 1XU sort code 60-60-08 and let Jill Rutland know which visits you are paying for. EMail  jill.rutland@hotmail.co.uk  or phone 01732 843248.

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FoKC SUMMER VISITS 2017

All church visit afternoons start at 2.00 pm. Timings for the rest of the afternoon and route instructions will be given on the day.

Locations shown use information in www.achurchnearyou.com  © 2016 Archbishops’ Council. Click on the church name in blue to see location.

Please apply using the FoKC 2017 Events booking form  also available with the 2016 Annual Report.

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Paul Smallwood is leading our final set of visits on 6th September to Bonnington, Bilsington and Kenardington. Parking arrangements yet to be finalised. Photographs and text courtesy of Chris Rigby.

St Rumwolds Church, Bonnington is believed to be one of the oldest on the Romney Marsh and is a small two cell church standing close to the banks of the Royal Military Canal. The building is 14th century in appearance resulting from the reconstruction of an original Saxon/Norman church. It is constructed in the Early English style with a timber framed porch added in the 14th century and a cupola added in the 17th century. An interesting feature is the prominent shape of a cross built into the roof tiles.

Viewed from the south-east

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Viewed from the north-west

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The font

Early 18th Century Grave Memorial

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The inscription of the early 18th century grave memorial located immediately to the south east of the church is relatively clear and appears to read:

‘Here Lieth James Jordan

Late Of This Parish Yeoman

He Died May ?? 1715

Age 68 Years

And Also Seven Children

Four By Mary His First Wife

One By Ann His Second

(unable to read) By Elizabeth His’

The lower part of the inscription having sunk below ground level.

St Peter and St Paul Bilsington can be dated back to the 12th century and probably replaced the Saxon church recorded in the Domesday Survey of 1086. The church is constructed of ragstone with a red brick and timbered porch, and above the ridge of the porch, and to the west of the porch roof, blocked-in archways can be detected upon very close inspection.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The two stage 15th century tower is set on a high plinth and completed with a timber belfry. The 15th century bell hung outside the church was removed from the belfry in the 1930’s amid concerns the timber bell frame could no longer support the weight of the bell.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

002 St Marys Church Kenardington Kent 210117 001 St Marys Church Kenardington Kent 210117

St Marys Church, Kenardington,is of 12th century origin and is what remains of a church damaged by a French raiding party in the fourteenth century and struck by lightening in 1559. Most of the church was demolished leaving only the former south aisle and chapel to form the current church. On the south wall original windows were reduced in size by filling in the outer sections leaving some fascinating shapes of ‘blind’ tracery. Photos and text courtesy of Chris Rigby.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Click here to find notes and pictures from recent visits and lectures.

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On 26th September (with a 1:45 p.m. start) we will have a trip to Rochester cathedral.

Please apply using the FoKC 2017 Events booking form  also available with the 2016 Annual Report.

We have Matthew Saunders lined up for a lecture on “The work of the friendless Churches and the challenge of redundancies” for 8th November.